When we need to ask.

deep in prayer. Forgiveness from the teachings of Rabbi Ashlag

What is a sin really?

In the Hebrew, the idea of sin, is  no way as harsh as it is in the English language. The word sin, chet, really means to miss the mark. Indeed,  all of us at times  look back at some aspect of our lives, and wish we had acted otherwise.

The Sages tell us that the force of the evil inclination , the self-centered ego is so strong that if God does not help us with it, it would cause us fall into evil every day!

So Rabbi Baruch Ashlag , the great Kabbalist, asks this simple question. If we are really unable to deal with our selfish love ourselves, what do we need to ask forgiveness for?

In his answer he shows us that the real need for forgiveness arises  because we did not ask God to help us when we needed to. Asking God to help us when we are struggling with our own selves maybe, surprisingly, quite difficult. It involves a giving up, and a wish for God to come close. Realizing what we need to ask forgiveness for actually helps us make better choices next time!

This podcast is dedicated for a Refuah Shlemah to my mother Chaya bat Sara Leah.

From Sefer Hama’amarim of Rabbi Baruch Shalom Ashlag ( article 4 תשמ”ח)

Learning Torah: with, and for my heart

Learning Torah for the tikkun of the heart: From the Kabbalah  of Rabbi Ashlag

Learning Torah with the heart

We can learn Torah with our minds only. Many people do. But that on its own won’t really fulfill the true reason for learning Torah. Yes, we need to learn in order to know how to fulfill the mitzvot. Yes, we need to learn in order to fulfill the daily mitzvah of learning Torah, but there are deeper reasons.

Rabbi Ibn Ezra, the great medieval commentator on the Torah said: the purpose of learning the Torah is to rectify the heart and thus come closer to God.

We need to ask the question, What do we mean by the heart? Some people consider it as the seat of feelings, some relate to it as simply an anatomical entity.Rabbi Ashlag unites both these approaches by telling us that the heart is actually our expression of our will or desire. Indeed when we get excited over something, our heart beats faster. When we are angry, we feel the blood throbbing in our ears.

Relating to our heart means relating to the true purpose of our lives
Listen to the podcast inspired by the writings of Rabbi Baruch Shalom Ashlag

Giving and receiving: Coming to a balance

Giving and receiving from the Kabbalah of Rabbi Ashlag

Giving with love

We are created from the dust of the earth. That means we all have the innate nature of desiring to receive happiness and goodness. This is in accordance with the Purpose of the Creator in His creation. So then why do we feel embarrassment or shame when we receive without having earned what we are receiving? This feeling of shame stems from another aspect of our Creation, an aspect connected with our true purpose in the world, that of tikkun.

Although our inbuilt nature is that of receiving we also were given the quality of being able to give. This came about with the union of the Sephirah of Malchut with that of Binah, whose aspect is that of compassion and giving unconditionally.

By giving to the other unconditionally we convert a finite separated vessel of receiving into an infinite channel for the goodness of the Creator.

From Rabbi Avraham Mordecai Gottlieb’s commentary on Matan Torah of the Baal HaSulam.

Listen Now (Podcast about 18 minutes).

Male and female He created him

The creation of Man : Rabbi Ashlag on the Zohar

The creation of Man

In Bereishit, Genesis chapter one: The Torah says: And God said, “Let us make Man in our image, like us.” This extraordinary sentence is the beginning of our history.

The creation of the human being differs from that of all other creatures. All other created beings have a singular nature; in their creation God said “Let there be… ” and that was followed by “and there was.” But for man both potential and actualization are reflected in his creation. “Let us make man.”

However this is not the only way in which Man’s creation differs form that of the other created beings “Let us make Man”, suggests the complexity of our nature. We are composed of both good and bad, light and dark. Unique in all creation, we have a unique role.

In this podcast we see how the Zohar and the Midrash learn the role of man and his nature from his creation.

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From the teachings of Rabbi Ashlag.
Taken from A Tapestry for the Soul (Nehora Press)

And God called the light “day”

“And God called the light “day” and the darkness “night”.” Why did He do that? What does this mean for me? These are questions that the great Kabbalist Rabbi Baruch Shalom Ashlag asks. His answer takes us to the Purpose of Creation, the process of Creation, and the role these play in our own individual lives.
Listen to full talk
And it was evening and it was morning one day

The Gift of the Vision

The words that start the Bible , ” In the beginning God created the heaven and earth,” also imply the completion, the time of the redemption. In the Ein Sof (he Infinite) God completed the thought of the Creation, instantly, as it arose. Although we work out our tikkun in actual practice during our incarnations in this world, we have to know that in the Ein Sof the souls are already finished and complete.Listen to this talk and find out how the vision of the end influences our daily lives.

www.nehorapress.com/image/users/115470/ftp/my_files/audio/the%20gift%20of%20th%20ev%20ision.mp3?id=10418829“> (ten minutes)

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Learning the Zohar : the Night of the Bride

The upcoming festival of Shavuot , the time of the giving of the Torah on Mount Sinai, is described in the Zohar as the “wedding” between the Bride, the souls, and the Holy Blessed One.
Learn this beautiful piece of Zohar together with Yedidah. 
Listen now http://www.nehorapress.com/115470/Audio-Classes